Pioneer Regional School Corporation
PO Box 577
413 S. Chicago St.
Royal Center, IN 46978


Mr. Charles Grable, Supt.
Phone: 574-643-2605
Fax: 574-643-9977

PHS - A Moment in Time. Lifetime of Pride!

PES - Live It! Love It! Shout It!

Welcome to Pioneer Regional School Corporation

Welcome to Pioneer Regional School Corporation

GrableIn May of this year, our Board of School Trustees confirmed my appointment as the next superintendent to lead Pioneer Regional Schools beginning July 1, 2017. I was privileged to attended Pioneer Regional Schools from kindergarten through grade 12. As a graduate of Pioneer, I am honored to be chosen for this tremendous leadership opportunity to give back to and serve Pioneer Regional Schools and our community.

The deep commitment and passion for public education in our community and the tremendous community support I remember as a student here at Pioneer is what attracted me to this position. I have a great deal of respect for the many opportunities provided for students and the district’s outstanding reputation for success, with an intentional focus on meeting the diverse needs of our students.

If you visit my office, you will see a large collection of giraffes. I don’t have them just because I like giraffes. There is a deeper meaning behind the giraffes which is associated with educating our youth. There are three links to my philosophy concerning education:

  1. With its long neck, the giraffe is an animal of vision. A vision, mission, and goals are critical to successfully staying current, relevant, and meeting the needs of our students as we prepare them for their future.
  2. The giraffe has the largest heart of any land mammal. That equates to having a big heart for students or being a gentle giant. Building positive relationships with students is the first critical step in meeting their needs.
  3. “Stick out your neck for kids.” We have to be willing to take risks and do everything possible to continually grow and improve as we strive to meet our students’ social, emotional, and educational needs.
I have developed a three-phase plan to ensure a smooth transition in leadership. The following phases are interwoven and will build upon the momentum established for continuous quality improvement by our highly dedicated and competent team of employees, as well as partners in education:

1. Listen and Learn
2. Engage and Empower
3. Synthesize and Strategize

Since June 5th I have had the opportunity to do a lot of listening and learning. I plan to continue this as we move through the school year. I have been fortunate to tour the district and to meet many stakeholders, as well as learn about the district’s programs and initiatives. As part of this process, I would be delighted to meet and/or speak with any community member or group, so please do not hesitate to contact me at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..

I am looking forward to engaging with the stakeholders of our community to develop a Strategic Plan that includes Core Values, Vision, Mission, Goals, and Key Strategies to meet those goals in order to build upon the quality educational programming and to prepare our students for life in the 21st century.

We will grow and work together to expand upon a strong foundation and tradition of academic and extra-curricular excellence, and continuous quality improvement!

Charles Grable, Superintendent

  • pdf
    (593 KB)
     
    Golf Scramble

      pdf Click Here (593 KB) to download a copy of this flyer.
  • Pioneer Regional School Corp.

    Chemical Spray Application July 25, 2017

    Proscapes will be on Pioneer Jr. Sr. High School grounds July 25, 2017 for pest control application. The application will be applied to the shrubs in the front of the building.

    The Talstar Professional Insecticide is a spray application.

    If you have any questions please contact Kenny Wheeldon, Maintenance Director 574-721- 5645

  • Dear Parents, Guardians and Students,

    Indiana State Law IC 20-30-5-18 requires that school systems provide important information to parents and guardians of all students about meningitis and the vaccines available to prevent one type of this serious illness at the beginning of each school year.

    One type of meningitis is caused by a bacteria called Neisseria meningitidis. Infections caused by this bacteria are serious, and may lead to death. Symptoms of an infection with Neisseria meningitidis may include a high fever, headache, stiff neck, nausea, confusion and a rash. This disease can become severe very quickly and often leads to deafness, mental retardation, loss of arms or legs, and even death.

    The bacteria can mainly be spread from person to person through the exchange of nose and throat secretions. This can occur through coughing, kissing, and sneezing. The bacteria are not spread by casual contact or by simply breathing the air where a person with meningitis has been. However, sometimes the bacteria that cause meningitis have spread to other people who have had close or prolonged contact with a patient with Neisseria meningitidis. People in the same household or anyone with direct contact with a patient's oral secretions (such as a boyfriend or girlfriend) would be considered at increased risk of getting the infection.

    There are two vaccines (Menactra and Menveo) that can prevent most cases of meningitis caused by this bacteria in people over the age of 9 months. The United States Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) recommends vaccination against this disease for all children 11-18 years of age. CDC recommends vaccination of children with the meningococcal vaccine at 11 or 12 years old, with a booster dose at 16 years old. Children ages 9 months-10 years old who have sickle cell anemia or problems with their immune systems should also receive the vaccine.

    One dose of meningococcal vaccine is required for students in grades 6 – 12. This is a legal requirement (Indiana Administrative Code 410 IAC 1-1-1). All students entering grades 6-12 need to have a record from the child’s doctor indicating the vaccine was given or a record of this immunization in the state immunization registry (CHIRP) prior to the start of the school year.

    Many local health departments and private healthcare providers offer this vaccine. Please contact your health care provider for specific instructions regarding your child.

    Additional information about meningococcal disease can be found at:

    The Indiana State Department of Health
    The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
    The Indiana Department of Education School Health Student Services
  • GrableIn May of this year, our Board of School Trustees confirmed my appointment as the next superintendent to lead Pioneer Regional Schools beginning July 1, 2017. I was privileged to attended Pioneer Regional Schools from kindergarten through grade 12. As a graduate of Pioneer, I am honored to be chosen for this tremendous leadership opportunity to give back to and serve Pioneer Regional Schools and our community.

    The deep commitment and passion for public education in our community and the tremendous community support I remember as a student here at Pioneer is what attracted me to this position. I have a great deal of respect for the many opportunities provided for students and the district’s outstanding reputation for success, with an intentional focus on meeting the diverse needs of our students.

    If you visit my office, you will see a large collection of giraffes. I don’t have them just because I like giraffes. There is a deeper meaning behind the giraffes which is associated with educating our youth. There are three links to my philosophy concerning education:

    1. With its long neck, the giraffe is an animal of vision. A vision, mission, and goals are critical to successfully staying current, relevant, and meeting the needs of our students as we prepare them for their future.
    2. The giraffe has the largest heart of any land mammal. That equates to having a big heart for students or being a gentle giant. Building positive relationships with students is the first critical step in meeting their needs.
    3. “Stick out your neck for kids.” We have to be willing to take risks and do everything possible to continually grow and improve as we strive to meet our students’ social, emotional, and educational needs.
    I have developed a three-phase plan to ensure a smooth transition in leadership. The following phases are interwoven and will build upon the momentum established for continuous quality improvement by our highly dedicated and competent team of employees, as well as partners in education:

    1. Listen and Learn
    2. Engage and Empower
    3. Synthesize and Strategize

    Since June 5th I have had the opportunity to do a lot of listening and learning. I plan to continue this as we move through the school year. I have been fortunate to tour the district and to meet many stakeholders, as well as learn about the district’s programs and initiatives. As part of this process, I would be delighted to meet and/or speak with any community member or group, so please do not hesitate to contact me at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..

    I am looking forward to engaging with the stakeholders of our community to develop a Strategic Plan that includes Core Values, Vision, Mission, Goals, and Key Strategies to meet those goals in order to build upon the quality educational programming and to prepare our students for life in the 21st century.

    We will grow and work together to expand upon a strong foundation and tradition of academic and extra-curricular excellence, and continuous quality improvement!

    Charles Grable, Superintendent

    • Dear Parents, Guardians and Students,

      Indiana State Law IC 20-30-5-18 requires that school systems provide important information to parents and guardians of all students about meningitis and the vaccines available to prevent one type of this serious illness at the beginning of each school year.

      One type of meningitis is caused by a bacteria called Neisseria meningitidis. Infections caused by this bacteria are serious, and may lead to death. Symptoms of an infection with Neisseria meningitidis may include a high fever, headache, stiff neck, nausea, confusion and a rash. This disease can become severe very quickly and often leads to deafness, mental retardation, loss of arms or legs, and even death.

      The bacteria can mainly be spread from person to person through the exchange of nose and throat secretions. This can occur through coughing, kissing, and sneezing. The bacteria are not spread by casual contact or by simply breathing the air where a person with meningitis has been. However, sometimes the bacteria that cause meningitis have spread to other people who have had close or prolonged contact with a patient with Neisseria meningitidis. People in the same household or anyone with direct contact with a patient's oral secretions (such as a boyfriend or girlfriend) would be considered at increased risk of getting the infection.

      There are two vaccines (Menactra and Menveo) that can prevent most cases of meningitis caused by this bacteria in people over the age of 9 months. The United States Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) recommends vaccination against this disease for all children 11-18 years of age. CDC recommends vaccination of children with the meningococcal vaccine at 11 or 12 years old, with a booster dose at 16 years old. Children ages 9 months-10 years old who have sickle cell anemia or problems with their immune systems should also receive the vaccine.

      One dose of meningococcal vaccine is required for students in grades 6 – 12. This is a legal requirement (Indiana Administrative Code 410 IAC 1-1-1). All students entering grades 6-12 need to have a record from the child’s doctor indicating the vaccine was given or a record of this immunization in the state immunization registry (CHIRP) prior to the start of the school year.

      Many local health departments and private healthcare providers offer this vaccine. Please contact your health care provider for specific instructions regarding your child.

      Additional information about meningococcal disease can be found at:

      The Indiana State Department of Health
      The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
      The Indiana Department of Education School Health Student Services
    • GrableIn May of this year, our Board of School Trustees confirmed my appointment as the next superintendent to lead Pioneer Regional Schools beginning July 1, 2017. I was privileged to attended Pioneer Regional Schools from kindergarten through grade 12. As a graduate of Pioneer, I am honored to be chosen for this tremendous leadership opportunity to give back to and serve Pioneer Regional Schools and our community.

      The deep commitment and passion for public education in our community and the tremendous community support I remember as a student here at Pioneer is what attracted me to this position. I have a great deal of respect for the many opportunities provided for students and the district’s outstanding reputation for success, with an intentional focus on meeting the diverse needs of our students.

      If you visit my office, you will see a large collection of giraffes. I don’t have them just because I like giraffes. There is a deeper meaning behind the giraffes which is associated with educating our youth. There are three links to my philosophy concerning education:

      1. With its long neck, the giraffe is an animal of vision. A vision, mission, and goals are critical to successfully staying current, relevant, and meeting the needs of our students as we prepare them for their future.
      2. The giraffe has the largest heart of any land mammal. That equates to having a big heart for students or being a gentle giant. Building positive relationships with students is the first critical step in meeting their needs.
      3. “Stick out your neck for kids.” We have to be willing to take risks and do everything possible to continually grow and improve as we strive to meet our students’ social, emotional, and educational needs.
      I have developed a three-phase plan to ensure a smooth transition in leadership. The following phases are interwoven and will build upon the momentum established for continuous quality improvement by our highly dedicated and competent team of employees, as well as partners in education:

      1. Listen and Learn
      2. Engage and Empower
      3. Synthesize and Strategize

      Since June 5th I have had the opportunity to do a lot of listening and learning. I plan to continue this as we move through the school year. I have been fortunate to tour the district and to meet many stakeholders, as well as learn about the district’s programs and initiatives. As part of this process, I would be delighted to meet and/or speak with any community member or group, so please do not hesitate to contact me at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..

      I am looking forward to engaging with the stakeholders of our community to develop a Strategic Plan that includes Core Values, Vision, Mission, Goals, and Key Strategies to meet those goals in order to build upon the quality educational programming and to prepare our students for life in the 21st century.

      We will grow and work together to expand upon a strong foundation and tradition of academic and extra-curricular excellence, and continuous quality improvement!

      Charles Grable, Superintendent

      • Pioneer Regional School Corp.

        Chemical Spray Application July 25, 2017

        Proscapes will be on Pioneer Jr. Sr. High School grounds July 25, 2017 for pest control application. The application will be applied to the shrubs in the front of the building.

        The Talstar Professional Insecticide is a spray application.

        If you have any questions please contact Kenny Wheeldon, Maintenance Director 574-721- 5645

      • GrableIn May of this year, our Board of School Trustees confirmed my appointment as the next superintendent to lead Pioneer Regional Schools beginning July 1, 2017. I was privileged to attended Pioneer Regional Schools from kindergarten through grade 12. As a graduate of Pioneer, I am honored to be chosen for this tremendous leadership opportunity to give back to and serve Pioneer Regional Schools and our community.

        The deep commitment and passion for public education in our community and the tremendous community support I remember as a student here at Pioneer is what attracted me to this position. I have a great deal of respect for the many opportunities provided for students and the district’s outstanding reputation for success, with an intentional focus on meeting the diverse needs of our students.

        If you visit my office, you will see a large collection of giraffes. I don’t have them just because I like giraffes. There is a deeper meaning behind the giraffes which is associated with educating our youth. There are three links to my philosophy concerning education:

        1. With its long neck, the giraffe is an animal of vision. A vision, mission, and goals are critical to successfully staying current, relevant, and meeting the needs of our students as we prepare them for their future.
        2. The giraffe has the largest heart of any land mammal. That equates to having a big heart for students or being a gentle giant. Building positive relationships with students is the first critical step in meeting their needs.
        3. “Stick out your neck for kids.” We have to be willing to take risks and do everything possible to continually grow and improve as we strive to meet our students’ social, emotional, and educational needs.
        I have developed a three-phase plan to ensure a smooth transition in leadership. The following phases are interwoven and will build upon the momentum established for continuous quality improvement by our highly dedicated and competent team of employees, as well as partners in education:

        1. Listen and Learn
        2. Engage and Empower
        3. Synthesize and Strategize

        Since June 5th I have had the opportunity to do a lot of listening and learning. I plan to continue this as we move through the school year. I have been fortunate to tour the district and to meet many stakeholders, as well as learn about the district’s programs and initiatives. As part of this process, I would be delighted to meet and/or speak with any community member or group, so please do not hesitate to contact me at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..

        I am looking forward to engaging with the stakeholders of our community to develop a Strategic Plan that includes Core Values, Vision, Mission, Goals, and Key Strategies to meet those goals in order to build upon the quality educational programming and to prepare our students for life in the 21st century.

        We will grow and work together to expand upon a strong foundation and tradition of academic and extra-curricular excellence, and continuous quality improvement!

        Charles Grable, Superintendent

        • Dear Parents, Guardians and Students,

          Indiana State Law IC 20-30-5-18 requires that school systems provide important information to parents and guardians of all students about meningitis and the vaccines available to prevent one type of this serious illness at the beginning of each school year.

          One type of meningitis is caused by a bacteria called Neisseria meningitidis. Infections caused by this bacteria are serious, and may lead to death. Symptoms of an infection with Neisseria meningitidis may include a high fever, headache, stiff neck, nausea, confusion and a rash. This disease can become severe very quickly and often leads to deafness, mental retardation, loss of arms or legs, and even death.

          The bacteria can mainly be spread from person to person through the exchange of nose and throat secretions. This can occur through coughing, kissing, and sneezing. The bacteria are not spread by casual contact or by simply breathing the air where a person with meningitis has been. However, sometimes the bacteria that cause meningitis have spread to other people who have had close or prolonged contact with a patient with Neisseria meningitidis. People in the same household or anyone with direct contact with a patient's oral secretions (such as a boyfriend or girlfriend) would be considered at increased risk of getting the infection.

          There are two vaccines (Menactra and Menveo) that can prevent most cases of meningitis caused by this bacteria in people over the age of 9 months. The United States Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) recommends vaccination against this disease for all children 11-18 years of age. CDC recommends vaccination of children with the meningococcal vaccine at 11 or 12 years old, with a booster dose at 16 years old. Children ages 9 months-10 years old who have sickle cell anemia or problems with their immune systems should also receive the vaccine.

          One dose of meningococcal vaccine is required for students in grades 6 – 12. This is a legal requirement (Indiana Administrative Code 410 IAC 1-1-1). All students entering grades 6-12 need to have a record from the child’s doctor indicating the vaccine was given or a record of this immunization in the state immunization registry (CHIRP) prior to the start of the school year.

          Many local health departments and private healthcare providers offer this vaccine. Please contact your health care provider for specific instructions regarding your child.

          Additional information about meningococcal disease can be found at:

          The Indiana State Department of Health
          The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
          The Indiana Department of Education School Health Student Services
        • pdf
          (593 KB)
           
          Golf Scramble

            pdf Click Here (593 KB) to download a copy of this flyer.
        • Pioneer Regional School Corp.

          Chemical Spray Application July 25, 2017

          Proscapes will be on Pioneer Jr. Sr. High School grounds July 25, 2017 for pest control application. The application will be applied to the shrubs in the front of the building.

          The Talstar Professional Insecticide is a spray application.

          If you have any questions please contact Kenny Wheeldon, Maintenance Director 574-721- 5645

        • GrableIn May of this year, our Board of School Trustees confirmed my appointment as the next superintendent to lead Pioneer Regional Schools beginning July 1, 2017. I was privileged to attended Pioneer Regional Schools from kindergarten through grade 12. As a graduate of Pioneer, I am honored to be chosen for this tremendous leadership opportunity to give back to and serve Pioneer Regional Schools and our community.

          The deep commitment and passion for public education in our community and the tremendous community support I remember as a student here at Pioneer is what attracted me to this position. I have a great deal of respect for the many opportunities provided for students and the district’s outstanding reputation for success, with an intentional focus on meeting the diverse needs of our students.

          If you visit my office, you will see a large collection of giraffes. I don’t have them just because I like giraffes. There is a deeper meaning behind the giraffes which is associated with educating our youth. There are three links to my philosophy concerning education:

          1. With its long neck, the giraffe is an animal of vision. A vision, mission, and goals are critical to successfully staying current, relevant, and meeting the needs of our students as we prepare them for their future.
          2. The giraffe has the largest heart of any land mammal. That equates to having a big heart for students or being a gentle giant. Building positive relationships with students is the first critical step in meeting their needs.
          3. “Stick out your neck for kids.” We have to be willing to take risks and do everything possible to continually grow and improve as we strive to meet our students’ social, emotional, and educational needs.
          I have developed a three-phase plan to ensure a smooth transition in leadership. The following phases are interwoven and will build upon the momentum established for continuous quality improvement by our highly dedicated and competent team of employees, as well as partners in education:

          1. Listen and Learn
          2. Engage and Empower
          3. Synthesize and Strategize

          Since June 5th I have had the opportunity to do a lot of listening and learning. I plan to continue this as we move through the school year. I have been fortunate to tour the district and to meet many stakeholders, as well as learn about the district’s programs and initiatives. As part of this process, I would be delighted to meet and/or speak with any community member or group, so please do not hesitate to contact me at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..

          I am looking forward to engaging with the stakeholders of our community to develop a Strategic Plan that includes Core Values, Vision, Mission, Goals, and Key Strategies to meet those goals in order to build upon the quality educational programming and to prepare our students for life in the 21st century.

          We will grow and work together to expand upon a strong foundation and tradition of academic and extra-curricular excellence, and continuous quality improvement!

          Charles Grable, Superintendent

          • Dear Parents, Guardians and Students,

            Indiana State Law IC 20-30-5-18 requires that school systems provide important information to parents and guardians of all students about meningitis and the vaccines available to prevent one type of this serious illness at the beginning of each school year.

            One type of meningitis is caused by a bacteria called Neisseria meningitidis. Infections caused by this bacteria are serious, and may lead to death. Symptoms of an infection with Neisseria meningitidis may include a high fever, headache, stiff neck, nausea, confusion and a rash. This disease can become severe very quickly and often leads to deafness, mental retardation, loss of arms or legs, and even death.

            The bacteria can mainly be spread from person to person through the exchange of nose and throat secretions. This can occur through coughing, kissing, and sneezing. The bacteria are not spread by casual contact or by simply breathing the air where a person with meningitis has been. However, sometimes the bacteria that cause meningitis have spread to other people who have had close or prolonged contact with a patient with Neisseria meningitidis. People in the same household or anyone with direct contact with a patient's oral secretions (such as a boyfriend or girlfriend) would be considered at increased risk of getting the infection.

            There are two vaccines (Menactra and Menveo) that can prevent most cases of meningitis caused by this bacteria in people over the age of 9 months. The United States Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) recommends vaccination against this disease for all children 11-18 years of age. CDC recommends vaccination of children with the meningococcal vaccine at 11 or 12 years old, with a booster dose at 16 years old. Children ages 9 months-10 years old who have sickle cell anemia or problems with their immune systems should also receive the vaccine.

            One dose of meningococcal vaccine is required for students in grades 6 – 12. This is a legal requirement (Indiana Administrative Code 410 IAC 1-1-1). All students entering grades 6-12 need to have a record from the child’s doctor indicating the vaccine was given or a record of this immunization in the state immunization registry (CHIRP) prior to the start of the school year.

            Many local health departments and private healthcare providers offer this vaccine. Please contact your health care provider for specific instructions regarding your child.

            Additional information about meningococcal disease can be found at:

            The Indiana State Department of Health
            The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
            The Indiana Department of Education School Health Student Services
          • pdf
            (593 KB)
             
            Golf Scramble

              pdf Click Here (593 KB) to download a copy of this flyer.
          • Pioneer Regional School Corp.

            Chemical Spray Application July 25, 2017

            Proscapes will be on Pioneer Jr. Sr. High School grounds July 25, 2017 for pest control application. The application will be applied to the shrubs in the front of the building.

            The Talstar Professional Insecticide is a spray application.

            If you have any questions please contact Kenny Wheeldon, Maintenance Director 574-721- 5645

          • GrableIn May of this year, our Board of School Trustees confirmed my appointment as the next superintendent to lead Pioneer Regional Schools beginning July 1, 2017. I was privileged to attended Pioneer Regional Schools from kindergarten through grade 12. As a graduate of Pioneer, I am honored to be chosen for this tremendous leadership opportunity to give back to and serve Pioneer Regional Schools and our community.

            The deep commitment and passion for public education in our community and the tremendous community support I remember as a student here at Pioneer is what attracted me to this position. I have a great deal of respect for the many opportunities provided for students and the district’s outstanding reputation for success, with an intentional focus on meeting the diverse needs of our students.

            If you visit my office, you will see a large collection of giraffes. I don’t have them just because I like giraffes. There is a deeper meaning behind the giraffes which is associated with educating our youth. There are three links to my philosophy concerning education:

            1. With its long neck, the giraffe is an animal of vision. A vision, mission, and goals are critical to successfully staying current, relevant, and meeting the needs of our students as we prepare them for their future.
            2. The giraffe has the largest heart of any land mammal. That equates to having a big heart for students or being a gentle giant. Building positive relationships with students is the first critical step in meeting their needs.
            3. “Stick out your neck for kids.” We have to be willing to take risks and do everything possible to continually grow and improve as we strive to meet our students’ social, emotional, and educational needs.
            I have developed a three-phase plan to ensure a smooth transition in leadership. The following phases are interwoven and will build upon the momentum established for continuous quality improvement by our highly dedicated and competent team of employees, as well as partners in education:

            1. Listen and Learn
            2. Engage and Empower
            3. Synthesize and Strategize

            Since June 5th I have had the opportunity to do a lot of listening and learning. I plan to continue this as we move through the school year. I have been fortunate to tour the district and to meet many stakeholders, as well as learn about the district’s programs and initiatives. As part of this process, I would be delighted to meet and/or speak with any community member or group, so please do not hesitate to contact me at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..

            I am looking forward to engaging with the stakeholders of our community to develop a Strategic Plan that includes Core Values, Vision, Mission, Goals, and Key Strategies to meet those goals in order to build upon the quality educational programming and to prepare our students for life in the 21st century.

            We will grow and work together to expand upon a strong foundation and tradition of academic and extra-curricular excellence, and continuous quality improvement!

            Charles Grable, Superintendent

            • pdf
              (593 KB)
               
              Golf Scramble

                pdf Click Here (593 KB) to download a copy of this flyer.
            • Pioneer Regional School Corp.

              Chemical Spray Application July 25, 2017

              Proscapes will be on Pioneer Jr. Sr. High School grounds July 25, 2017 for pest control application. The application will be applied to the shrubs in the front of the building.

              The Talstar Professional Insecticide is a spray application.

              If you have any questions please contact Kenny Wheeldon, Maintenance Director 574-721- 5645

            • Dear Parents, Guardians and Students,

              Indiana State Law IC 20-30-5-18 requires that school systems provide important information to parents and guardians of all students about meningitis and the vaccines available to prevent one type of this serious illness at the beginning of each school year.

              One type of meningitis is caused by a bacteria called Neisseria meningitidis. Infections caused by this bacteria are serious, and may lead to death. Symptoms of an infection with Neisseria meningitidis may include a high fever, headache, stiff neck, nausea, confusion and a rash. This disease can become severe very quickly and often leads to deafness, mental retardation, loss of arms or legs, and even death.

              The bacteria can mainly be spread from person to person through the exchange of nose and throat secretions. This can occur through coughing, kissing, and sneezing. The bacteria are not spread by casual contact or by simply breathing the air where a person with meningitis has been. However, sometimes the bacteria that cause meningitis have spread to other people who have had close or prolonged contact with a patient with Neisseria meningitidis. People in the same household or anyone with direct contact with a patient's oral secretions (such as a boyfriend or girlfriend) would be considered at increased risk of getting the infection.

              There are two vaccines (Menactra and Menveo) that can prevent most cases of meningitis caused by this bacteria in people over the age of 9 months. The United States Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) recommends vaccination against this disease for all children 11-18 years of age. CDC recommends vaccination of children with the meningococcal vaccine at 11 or 12 years old, with a booster dose at 16 years old. Children ages 9 months-10 years old who have sickle cell anemia or problems with their immune systems should also receive the vaccine.

              One dose of meningococcal vaccine is required for students in grades 6 – 12. This is a legal requirement (Indiana Administrative Code 410 IAC 1-1-1). All students entering grades 6-12 need to have a record from the child’s doctor indicating the vaccine was given or a record of this immunization in the state immunization registry (CHIRP) prior to the start of the school year.

              Many local health departments and private healthcare providers offer this vaccine. Please contact your health care provider for specific instructions regarding your child.

              Additional information about meningococcal disease can be found at:

              The Indiana State Department of Health
              The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
              The Indiana Department of Education School Health Student Services
            • GrableIn May of this year, our Board of School Trustees confirmed my appointment as the next superintendent to lead Pioneer Regional Schools beginning July 1, 2017. I was privileged to attended Pioneer Regional Schools from kindergarten through grade 12. As a graduate of Pioneer, I am honored to be chosen for this tremendous leadership opportunity to give back to and serve Pioneer Regional Schools and our community.

              The deep commitment and passion for public education in our community and the tremendous community support I remember as a student here at Pioneer is what attracted me to this position. I have a great deal of respect for the many opportunities provided for students and the district’s outstanding reputation for success, with an intentional focus on meeting the diverse needs of our students.

              If you visit my office, you will see a large collection of giraffes. I don’t have them just because I like giraffes. There is a deeper meaning behind the giraffes which is associated with educating our youth. There are three links to my philosophy concerning education:

              1. With its long neck, the giraffe is an animal of vision. A vision, mission, and goals are critical to successfully staying current, relevant, and meeting the needs of our students as we prepare them for their future.
              2. The giraffe has the largest heart of any land mammal. That equates to having a big heart for students or being a gentle giant. Building positive relationships with students is the first critical step in meeting their needs.
              3. “Stick out your neck for kids.” We have to be willing to take risks and do everything possible to continually grow and improve as we strive to meet our students’ social, emotional, and educational needs.
              I have developed a three-phase plan to ensure a smooth transition in leadership. The following phases are interwoven and will build upon the momentum established for continuous quality improvement by our highly dedicated and competent team of employees, as well as partners in education:

              1. Listen and Learn
              2. Engage and Empower
              3. Synthesize and Strategize

              Since June 5th I have had the opportunity to do a lot of listening and learning. I plan to continue this as we move through the school year. I have been fortunate to tour the district and to meet many stakeholders, as well as learn about the district’s programs and initiatives. As part of this process, I would be delighted to meet and/or speak with any community member or group, so please do not hesitate to contact me at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..

              I am looking forward to engaging with the stakeholders of our community to develop a Strategic Plan that includes Core Values, Vision, Mission, Goals, and Key Strategies to meet those goals in order to build upon the quality educational programming and to prepare our students for life in the 21st century.

              We will grow and work together to expand upon a strong foundation and tradition of academic and extra-curricular excellence, and continuous quality improvement!

              Charles Grable, Superintendent

              • Pioneer Regional School Corp.

                Chemical Spray Application July 25, 2017

                Proscapes will be on Pioneer Jr. Sr. High School grounds July 25, 2017 for pest control application. The application will be applied to the shrubs in the front of the building.

                The Talstar Professional Insecticide is a spray application.

                If you have any questions please contact Kenny Wheeldon, Maintenance Director 574-721- 5645

              • GrableIn May of this year, our Board of School Trustees confirmed my appointment as the next superintendent to lead Pioneer Regional Schools beginning July 1, 2017. I was privileged to attended Pioneer Regional Schools from kindergarten through grade 12. As a graduate of Pioneer, I am honored to be chosen for this tremendous leadership opportunity to give back to and serve Pioneer Regional Schools and our community.

                The deep commitment and passion for public education in our community and the tremendous community support I remember as a student here at Pioneer is what attracted me to this position. I have a great deal of respect for the many opportunities provided for students and the district’s outstanding reputation for success, with an intentional focus on meeting the diverse needs of our students.

                If you visit my office, you will see a large collection of giraffes. I don’t have them just because I like giraffes. There is a deeper meaning behind the giraffes which is associated with educating our youth. There are three links to my philosophy concerning education:

                1. With its long neck, the giraffe is an animal of vision. A vision, mission, and goals are critical to successfully staying current, relevant, and meeting the needs of our students as we prepare them for their future.
                2. The giraffe has the largest heart of any land mammal. That equates to having a big heart for students or being a gentle giant. Building positive relationships with students is the first critical step in meeting their needs.
                3. “Stick out your neck for kids.” We have to be willing to take risks and do everything possible to continually grow and improve as we strive to meet our students’ social, emotional, and educational needs.
                I have developed a three-phase plan to ensure a smooth transition in leadership. The following phases are interwoven and will build upon the momentum established for continuous quality improvement by our highly dedicated and competent team of employees, as well as partners in education:

                1. Listen and Learn
                2. Engage and Empower
                3. Synthesize and Strategize

                Since June 5th I have had the opportunity to do a lot of listening and learning. I plan to continue this as we move through the school year. I have been fortunate to tour the district and to meet many stakeholders, as well as learn about the district’s programs and initiatives. As part of this process, I would be delighted to meet and/or speak with any community member or group, so please do not hesitate to contact me at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..

                I am looking forward to engaging with the stakeholders of our community to develop a Strategic Plan that includes Core Values, Vision, Mission, Goals, and Key Strategies to meet those goals in order to build upon the quality educational programming and to prepare our students for life in the 21st century.

                We will grow and work together to expand upon a strong foundation and tradition of academic and extra-curricular excellence, and continuous quality improvement!

                Charles Grable, Superintendent

                • Pioneer Regional School Corp.

                  Chemical Spray Application July 25, 2017

                  Proscapes will be on Pioneer Jr. Sr. High School grounds July 25, 2017 for pest control application. The application will be applied to the shrubs in the front of the building.

                  The Talstar Professional Insecticide is a spray application.

                  If you have any questions please contact Kenny Wheeldon, Maintenance Director 574-721- 5645

                • Dear Parents, Guardians and Students,

                  Indiana State Law IC 20-30-5-18 requires that school systems provide important information to parents and guardians of all students about meningitis and the vaccines available to prevent one type of this serious illness at the beginning of each school year.

                  One type of meningitis is caused by a bacteria called Neisseria meningitidis. Infections caused by this bacteria are serious, and may lead to death. Symptoms of an infection with Neisseria meningitidis may include a high fever, headache, stiff neck, nausea, confusion and a rash. This disease can become severe very quickly and often leads to deafness, mental retardation, loss of arms or legs, and even death.

                  The bacteria can mainly be spread from person to person through the exchange of nose and throat secretions. This can occur through coughing, kissing, and sneezing. The bacteria are not spread by casual contact or by simply breathing the air where a person with meningitis has been. However, sometimes the bacteria that cause meningitis have spread to other people who have had close or prolonged contact with a patient with Neisseria meningitidis. People in the same household or anyone with direct contact with a patient's oral secretions (such as a boyfriend or girlfriend) would be considered at increased risk of getting the infection.

                  There are two vaccines (Menactra and Menveo) that can prevent most cases of meningitis caused by this bacteria in people over the age of 9 months. The United States Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) recommends vaccination against this disease for all children 11-18 years of age. CDC recommends vaccination of children with the meningococcal vaccine at 11 or 12 years old, with a booster dose at 16 years old. Children ages 9 months-10 years old who have sickle cell anemia or problems with their immune systems should also receive the vaccine.

                  One dose of meningococcal vaccine is required for students in grades 6 – 12. This is a legal requirement (Indiana Administrative Code 410 IAC 1-1-1). All students entering grades 6-12 need to have a record from the child’s doctor indicating the vaccine was given or a record of this immunization in the state immunization registry (CHIRP) prior to the start of the school year.

                  Many local health departments and private healthcare providers offer this vaccine. Please contact your health care provider for specific instructions regarding your child.

                  Additional information about meningococcal disease can be found at:

                  The Indiana State Department of Health
                  The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
                  The Indiana Department of Education School Health Student Services
                • GrableIn May of this year, our Board of School Trustees confirmed my appointment as the next superintendent to lead Pioneer Regional Schools beginning July 1, 2017. I was privileged to attended Pioneer Regional Schools from kindergarten through grade 12. As a graduate of Pioneer, I am honored to be chosen for this tremendous leadership opportunity to give back to and serve Pioneer Regional Schools and our community.

                  The deep commitment and passion for public education in our community and the tremendous community support I remember as a student here at Pioneer is what attracted me to this position. I have a great deal of respect for the many opportunities provided for students and the district’s outstanding reputation for success, with an intentional focus on meeting the diverse needs of our students.

                  If you visit my office, you will see a large collection of giraffes. I don’t have them just because I like giraffes. There is a deeper meaning behind the giraffes which is associated with educating our youth. There are three links to my philosophy concerning education:

                  1. With its long neck, the giraffe is an animal of vision. A vision, mission, and goals are critical to successfully staying current, relevant, and meeting the needs of our students as we prepare them for their future.
                  2. The giraffe has the largest heart of any land mammal. That equates to having a big heart for students or being a gentle giant. Building positive relationships with students is the first critical step in meeting their needs.
                  3. “Stick out your neck for kids.” We have to be willing to take risks and do everything possible to continually grow and improve as we strive to meet our students’ social, emotional, and educational needs.
                  I have developed a three-phase plan to ensure a smooth transition in leadership. The following phases are interwoven and will build upon the momentum established for continuous quality improvement by our highly dedicated and competent team of employees, as well as partners in education:

                  1. Listen and Learn
                  2. Engage and Empower
                  3. Synthesize and Strategize

                  Since June 5th I have had the opportunity to do a lot of listening and learning. I plan to continue this as we move through the school year. I have been fortunate to tour the district and to meet many stakeholders, as well as learn about the district’s programs and initiatives. As part of this process, I would be delighted to meet and/or speak with any community member or group, so please do not hesitate to contact me at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..

                  I am looking forward to engaging with the stakeholders of our community to develop a Strategic Plan that includes Core Values, Vision, Mission, Goals, and Key Strategies to meet those goals in order to build upon the quality educational programming and to prepare our students for life in the 21st century.

                  We will grow and work together to expand upon a strong foundation and tradition of academic and extra-curricular excellence, and continuous quality improvement!

                  Charles Grable, Superintendent

                  • GrableIn May of this year, our Board of School Trustees confirmed my appointment as the next superintendent to lead Pioneer Regional Schools beginning July 1, 2017. I was privileged to attended Pioneer Regional Schools from kindergarten through grade 12. As a graduate of Pioneer, I am honored to be chosen for this tremendous leadership opportunity to give back to and serve Pioneer Regional Schools and our community.

                    The deep commitment and passion for public education in our community and the tremendous community support I remember as a student here at Pioneer is what attracted me to this position. I have a great deal of respect for the many opportunities provided for students and the district’s outstanding reputation for success, with an intentional focus on meeting the diverse needs of our students.

                    If you visit my office, you will see a large collection of giraffes. I don’t have them just because I like giraffes. There is a deeper meaning behind the giraffes which is associated with educating our youth. There are three links to my philosophy concerning education:

                    1. With its long neck, the giraffe is an animal of vision. A vision, mission, and goals are critical to successfully staying current, relevant, and meeting the needs of our students as we prepare them for their future.
                    2. The giraffe has the largest heart of any land mammal. That equates to having a big heart for students or being a gentle giant. Building positive relationships with students is the first critical step in meeting their needs.
                    3. “Stick out your neck for kids.” We have to be willing to take risks and do everything possible to continually grow and improve as we strive to meet our students’ social, emotional, and educational needs.
                    I have developed a three-phase plan to ensure a smooth transition in leadership. The following phases are interwoven and will build upon the momentum established for continuous quality improvement by our highly dedicated and competent team of employees, as well as partners in education:

                    1. Listen and Learn
                    2. Engage and Empower
                    3. Synthesize and Strategize

                    Since June 5th I have had the opportunity to do a lot of listening and learning. I plan to continue this as we move through the school year. I have been fortunate to tour the district and to meet many stakeholders, as well as learn about the district’s programs and initiatives. As part of this process, I would be delighted to meet and/or speak with any community member or group, so please do not hesitate to contact me at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..

                    I am looking forward to engaging with the stakeholders of our community to develop a Strategic Plan that includes Core Values, Vision, Mission, Goals, and Key Strategies to meet those goals in order to build upon the quality educational programming and to prepare our students for life in the 21st century.

                    We will grow and work together to expand upon a strong foundation and tradition of academic and extra-curricular excellence, and continuous quality improvement!

                    Charles Grable, Superintendent

                    • Dear Parents, Guardians and Students,

                      Indiana State Law IC 20-30-5-18 requires that school systems provide important information to parents and guardians of all students about meningitis and the vaccines available to prevent one type of this serious illness at the beginning of each school year.

                      One type of meningitis is caused by a bacteria called Neisseria meningitidis. Infections caused by this bacteria are serious, and may lead to death. Symptoms of an infection with Neisseria meningitidis may include a high fever, headache, stiff neck, nausea, confusion and a rash. This disease can become severe very quickly and often leads to deafness, mental retardation, loss of arms or legs, and even death.

                      The bacteria can mainly be spread from person to person through the exchange of nose and throat secretions. This can occur through coughing, kissing, and sneezing. The bacteria are not spread by casual contact or by simply breathing the air where a person with meningitis has been. However, sometimes the bacteria that cause meningitis have spread to other people who have had close or prolonged contact with a patient with Neisseria meningitidis. People in the same household or anyone with direct contact with a patient's oral secretions (such as a boyfriend or girlfriend) would be considered at increased risk of getting the infection.

                      There are two vaccines (Menactra and Menveo) that can prevent most cases of meningitis caused by this bacteria in people over the age of 9 months. The United States Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) recommends vaccination against this disease for all children 11-18 years of age. CDC recommends vaccination of children with the meningococcal vaccine at 11 or 12 years old, with a booster dose at 16 years old. Children ages 9 months-10 years old who have sickle cell anemia or problems with their immune systems should also receive the vaccine.

                      One dose of meningococcal vaccine is required for students in grades 6 – 12. This is a legal requirement (Indiana Administrative Code 410 IAC 1-1-1). All students entering grades 6-12 need to have a record from the child’s doctor indicating the vaccine was given or a record of this immunization in the state immunization registry (CHIRP) prior to the start of the school year.

                      Many local health departments and private healthcare providers offer this vaccine. Please contact your health care provider for specific instructions regarding your child.

                      Additional information about meningococcal disease can be found at:

                      The Indiana State Department of Health
                      The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
                      The Indiana Department of Education School Health Student Services
                    • pdf
                      (593 KB)
                       
                      Golf Scramble

                        pdf Click Here (593 KB) to download a copy of this flyer.
                    • Pioneer Regional School Corp.

                      Chemical Spray Application July 25, 2017

                      Proscapes will be on Pioneer Jr. Sr. High School grounds July 25, 2017 for pest control application. The application will be applied to the shrubs in the front of the building.

                      The Talstar Professional Insecticide is a spray application.

                      If you have any questions please contact Kenny Wheeldon, Maintenance Director 574-721- 5645

                    • GrableIn May of this year, our Board of School Trustees confirmed my appointment as the next superintendent to lead Pioneer Regional Schools beginning July 1, 2017. I was privileged to attended Pioneer Regional Schools from kindergarten through grade 12. As a graduate of Pioneer, I am honored to be chosen for this tremendous leadership opportunity to give back to and serve Pioneer Regional Schools and our community.

                      The deep commitment and passion for public education in our community and the tremendous community support I remember as a student here at Pioneer is what attracted me to this position. I have a great deal of respect for the many opportunities provided for students and the district’s outstanding reputation for success, with an intentional focus on meeting the diverse needs of our students.

                      If you visit my office, you will see a large collection of giraffes. I don’t have them just because I like giraffes. There is a deeper meaning behind the giraffes which is associated with educating our youth. There are three links to my philosophy concerning education:

                      1. With its long neck, the giraffe is an animal of vision. A vision, mission, and goals are critical to successfully staying current, relevant, and meeting the needs of our students as we prepare them for their future.
                      2. The giraffe has the largest heart of any land mammal. That equates to having a big heart for students or being a gentle giant. Building positive relationships with students is the first critical step in meeting their needs.
                      3. “Stick out your neck for kids.” We have to be willing to take risks and do everything possible to continually grow and improve as we strive to meet our students’ social, emotional, and educational needs.
                      I have developed a three-phase plan to ensure a smooth transition in leadership. The following phases are interwoven and will build upon the momentum established for continuous quality improvement by our highly dedicated and competent team of employees, as well as partners in education:

                      1. Listen and Learn
                      2. Engage and Empower
                      3. Synthesize and Strategize

                      Since June 5th I have had the opportunity to do a lot of listening and learning. I plan to continue this as we move through the school year. I have been fortunate to tour the district and to meet many stakeholders, as well as learn about the district’s programs and initiatives. As part of this process, I would be delighted to meet and/or speak with any community member or group, so please do not hesitate to contact me at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..

                      I am looking forward to engaging with the stakeholders of our community to develop a Strategic Plan that includes Core Values, Vision, Mission, Goals, and Key Strategies to meet those goals in order to build upon the quality educational programming and to prepare our students for life in the 21st century.

                      We will grow and work together to expand upon a strong foundation and tradition of academic and extra-curricular excellence, and continuous quality improvement!

                      Charles Grable, Superintendent

                  • Pioneer Regional School Corp.

                    Chemical Spray Application July 25, 2017

                    Proscapes will be on Pioneer Jr. Sr. High School grounds July 25, 2017 for pest control application. The application will be applied to the shrubs in the front of the building.

                    The Talstar Professional Insecticide is a spray application.

                    If you have any questions please contact Kenny Wheeldon, Maintenance Director 574-721- 5645

                  • Dear Parents, Guardians and Students,

                    Indiana State Law IC 20-30-5-18 requires that school systems provide important information to parents and guardians of all students about meningitis and the vaccines available to prevent one type of this serious illness at the beginning of each school year.

                    One type of meningitis is caused by a bacteria called Neisseria meningitidis. Infections caused by this bacteria are serious, and may lead to death. Symptoms of an infection with Neisseria meningitidis may include a high fever, headache, stiff neck, nausea, confusion and a rash. This disease can become severe very quickly and often leads to deafness, mental retardation, loss of arms or legs, and even death.

                    The bacteria can mainly be spread from person to person through the exchange of nose and throat secretions. This can occur through coughing, kissing, and sneezing. The bacteria are not spread by casual contact or by simply breathing the air where a person with meningitis has been. However, sometimes the bacteria that cause meningitis have spread to other people who have had close or prolonged contact with a patient with Neisseria meningitidis. People in the same household or anyone with direct contact with a patient's oral secretions (such as a boyfriend or girlfriend) would be considered at increased risk of getting the infection.

                    There are two vaccines (Menactra and Menveo) that can prevent most cases of meningitis caused by this bacteria in people over the age of 9 months. The United States Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) recommends vaccination against this disease for all children 11-18 years of age. CDC recommends vaccination of children with the meningococcal vaccine at 11 or 12 years old, with a booster dose at 16 years old. Children ages 9 months-10 years old who have sickle cell anemia or problems with their immune systems should also receive the vaccine.

                    One dose of meningococcal vaccine is required for students in grades 6 – 12. This is a legal requirement (Indiana Administrative Code 410 IAC 1-1-1). All students entering grades 6-12 need to have a record from the child’s doctor indicating the vaccine was given or a record of this immunization in the state immunization registry (CHIRP) prior to the start of the school year.

                    Many local health departments and private healthcare providers offer this vaccine. Please contact your health care provider for specific instructions regarding your child.

                    Additional information about meningococcal disease can be found at:

                    The Indiana State Department of Health
                    The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
                    The Indiana Department of Education School Health Student Services
                  • pdf
                    (593 KB)
                     
                    Golf Scramble

                      pdf Click Here (593 KB) to download a copy of this flyer.
                • pdf
                  (593 KB)
                   
                  Golf Scramble

                    pdf Click Here (593 KB) to download a copy of this flyer.
              • pdf
                (593 KB)
                 
                Golf Scramble

                  pdf Click Here (593 KB) to download a copy of this flyer.
              • Dear Parents, Guardians and Students,

                Indiana State Law IC 20-30-5-18 requires that school systems provide important information to parents and guardians of all students about meningitis and the vaccines available to prevent one type of this serious illness at the beginning of each school year.

                One type of meningitis is caused by a bacteria called Neisseria meningitidis. Infections caused by this bacteria are serious, and may lead to death. Symptoms of an infection with Neisseria meningitidis may include a high fever, headache, stiff neck, nausea, confusion and a rash. This disease can become severe very quickly and often leads to deafness, mental retardation, loss of arms or legs, and even death.

                The bacteria can mainly be spread from person to person through the exchange of nose and throat secretions. This can occur through coughing, kissing, and sneezing. The bacteria are not spread by casual contact or by simply breathing the air where a person with meningitis has been. However, sometimes the bacteria that cause meningitis have spread to other people who have had close or prolonged contact with a patient with Neisseria meningitidis. People in the same household or anyone with direct contact with a patient's oral secretions (such as a boyfriend or girlfriend) would be considered at increased risk of getting the infection.

                There are two vaccines (Menactra and Menveo) that can prevent most cases of meningitis caused by this bacteria in people over the age of 9 months. The United States Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) recommends vaccination against this disease for all children 11-18 years of age. CDC recommends vaccination of children with the meningococcal vaccine at 11 or 12 years old, with a booster dose at 16 years old. Children ages 9 months-10 years old who have sickle cell anemia or problems with their immune systems should also receive the vaccine.

                One dose of meningococcal vaccine is required for students in grades 6 – 12. This is a legal requirement (Indiana Administrative Code 410 IAC 1-1-1). All students entering grades 6-12 need to have a record from the child’s doctor indicating the vaccine was given or a record of this immunization in the state immunization registry (CHIRP) prior to the start of the school year.

                Many local health departments and private healthcare providers offer this vaccine. Please contact your health care provider for specific instructions regarding your child.

                Additional information about meningococcal disease can be found at:

                The Indiana State Department of Health
                The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
                The Indiana Department of Education School Health Student Services
      • pdf
        (593 KB)
         
        Golf Scramble

          pdf Click Here (593 KB) to download a copy of this flyer.
      • Dear Parents, Guardians and Students,

        Indiana State Law IC 20-30-5-18 requires that school systems provide important information to parents and guardians of all students about meningitis and the vaccines available to prevent one type of this serious illness at the beginning of each school year.

        One type of meningitis is caused by a bacteria called Neisseria meningitidis. Infections caused by this bacteria are serious, and may lead to death. Symptoms of an infection with Neisseria meningitidis may include a high fever, headache, stiff neck, nausea, confusion and a rash. This disease can become severe very quickly and often leads to deafness, mental retardation, loss of arms or legs, and even death.

        The bacteria can mainly be spread from person to person through the exchange of nose and throat secretions. This can occur through coughing, kissing, and sneezing. The bacteria are not spread by casual contact or by simply breathing the air where a person with meningitis has been. However, sometimes the bacteria that cause meningitis have spread to other people who have had close or prolonged contact with a patient with Neisseria meningitidis. People in the same household or anyone with direct contact with a patient's oral secretions (such as a boyfriend or girlfriend) would be considered at increased risk of getting the infection.

        There are two vaccines (Menactra and Menveo) that can prevent most cases of meningitis caused by this bacteria in people over the age of 9 months. The United States Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) recommends vaccination against this disease for all children 11-18 years of age. CDC recommends vaccination of children with the meningococcal vaccine at 11 or 12 years old, with a booster dose at 16 years old. Children ages 9 months-10 years old who have sickle cell anemia or problems with their immune systems should also receive the vaccine.

        One dose of meningococcal vaccine is required for students in grades 6 – 12. This is a legal requirement (Indiana Administrative Code 410 IAC 1-1-1). All students entering grades 6-12 need to have a record from the child’s doctor indicating the vaccine was given or a record of this immunization in the state immunization registry (CHIRP) prior to the start of the school year.

        Many local health departments and private healthcare providers offer this vaccine. Please contact your health care provider for specific instructions regarding your child.

        Additional information about meningococcal disease can be found at:

        The Indiana State Department of Health
        The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
        The Indiana Department of Education School Health Student Services
    • Pioneer Regional School Corp.

      Chemical Spray Application July 25, 2017

      Proscapes will be on Pioneer Jr. Sr. High School grounds July 25, 2017 for pest control application. The application will be applied to the shrubs in the front of the building.

      The Talstar Professional Insecticide is a spray application.

      If you have any questions please contact Kenny Wheeldon, Maintenance Director 574-721- 5645

    • pdf
      (593 KB)
       
      Golf Scramble

        pdf Click Here (593 KB) to download a copy of this flyer.

Print Email

PHS Athletic Dept. Golf Scramble

Chemical Spray Notice

Chemical Spray Notice

*
Pioneer Regional School Corp.

Chemical Spray Application July 25, 2017

Proscapes will be on Pioneer Jr. Sr. High School grounds July 25, 2017 for pest control application. The application will be applied to the shrubs in the front of the building.

The Talstar Professional Insecticide is a spray application.

If you have any questions please contact Kenny Wheeldon, Maintenance Director 574-721- 5645

Print Email

Health News

Health News

Dear Parents, Guardians and Students,

Indiana State Law IC 20-30-5-18 requires that school systems provide important information to parents and guardians of all students about meningitis and the vaccines available to prevent one type of this serious illness at the beginning of each school year.

One type of meningitis is caused by a bacteria called Neisseria meningitidis. Infections caused by this bacteria are serious, and may lead to death. Symptoms of an infection with Neisseria meningitidis may include a high fever, headache, stiff neck, nausea, confusion and a rash. This disease can become severe very quickly and often leads to deafness, mental retardation, loss of arms or legs, and even death.

The bacteria can mainly be spread from person to person through the exchange of nose and throat secretions. This can occur through coughing, kissing, and sneezing. The bacteria are not spread by casual contact or by simply breathing the air where a person with meningitis has been. However, sometimes the bacteria that cause meningitis have spread to other people who have had close or prolonged contact with a patient with Neisseria meningitidis. People in the same household or anyone with direct contact with a patient's oral secretions (such as a boyfriend or girlfriend) would be considered at increased risk of getting the infection.

There are two vaccines (Menactra and Menveo) that can prevent most cases of meningitis caused by this bacteria in people over the age of 9 months. The United States Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) recommends vaccination against this disease for all children 11-18 years of age. CDC recommends vaccination of children with the meningococcal vaccine at 11 or 12 years old, with a booster dose at 16 years old. Children ages 9 months-10 years old who have sickle cell anemia or problems with their immune systems should also receive the vaccine.

One dose of meningococcal vaccine is required for students in grades 6 – 12. This is a legal requirement (Indiana Administrative Code 410 IAC 1-1-1). All students entering grades 6-12 need to have a record from the child’s doctor indicating the vaccine was given or a record of this immunization in the state immunization registry (CHIRP) prior to the start of the school year.

Many local health departments and private healthcare providers offer this vaccine. Please contact your health care provider for specific instructions regarding your child.

Additional information about meningococcal disease can be found at:

The Indiana State Department of Health
The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
The Indiana Department of Education School Health Student Services

Print Email

ib logo
    • Corporation Office

      Pioneer Regional School Corporation
      413 S. Chicago St.
      Royal Center, IN 46978

      Mr. Charles Grable, Supt.
      Phone: 574-643-2605
      Fax: 574-643-9977

      Jr./Sr. High School

      Pioneer Jr./Sr. High School
      417 S. Chicago St.
      Royal Center, IN 46978

      Mr. Jeremy Tucker, Principal
      Phone: 574-643-3145
      Fax: 574-643-2020
    • Elementary School

      Pioneer Elementary School
      109 E. Black Lane
      Royal Center, IN 46978

      Dr. Beth Dean, Principal
      Phone: 574-643-2255
      Fax: 574-643-4029
  • Location